MUSIC: Hawaii Samurai – “Surf’N’Destory”

Feeling a little lazy today so I am just going to post of this song here. It is, “Surf N Destroy”, played by the, Hawaii Samurai. Sounds cool and spacey, with a little bit of a Dick Dale vibe.

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Just found this awesom song on Pandora. I usally loath Pandora, since when I pick out a band after about two songs it starts to play other bands or genras. However I found this one station that plays (mostly) new blues songs and have been finding a lot of good stuff. Here is there bio that I found for King Kong.

Ethan Buckler was originally the bassist for underground Louisville, KY, sensations Slint during the late ’80s, but Continue reading

Tune: Wipe Out

This song is one of my favorite recordings that The Ventures did. However, they were not the ones that originally composed the song. It was actually The Surfaris back in 1963. Bob Berryhill, Pat Connolly, Jim Fuller and Ron Wilson wrote the tune almost on the spot as a suitable B-side was needed for the intended “Surfer Joe” single. In late 1962, while the band was in Cucamonga’s Pal Recording Studio recording the single, one of the band members suggested that a gimmick sound indicating a wipe out off a surfboard be emulated. The suggestion was made that during the introduction before the music starts, a cracking sound, imitating a breaking surfboard, should be made. This followed by a manic voice babbling, “ha ha ha ha ha, wipe out.” The spoken voice at the beginning of the song is the voice of the band’s manager of the time, Dale Smallin.

The afterthought track spent four months on the national Billboard chart in the autumn of 1963, reaching #2 and kept out of the top slot only by Stevie Wonder’s “Fingertips”. The smash hit “Wipe Out” returned to the Hot 100 in 1966, reaching #16 in Billboard and #9 in Cash Box in its second national chart run. This time it is said to have sold around 700,000 copies in the US to add to its original million-plus. Ironically the original A-side “Surfer Joe”, sung by Ron Wilson, only attracted airplay in the wake of “Wipe Out”‘s success, and peaked at #62 during its six-week run. Ron Wilson’s energetic drum solo for “Wipe Out” (a sped-up version of his Charter Oak High School marching band’s drum cadence) was beaten out on malt-shop tables all over the country, helping the song become one of the best-remembered instrumental tunes of the period. Drummer Sandy Nelson issued different versions on different LPs.

It is sometimes funny to see that songs that were just made to be B-Sides and not the song that was expected to be the hit, end up being the best ones.

Info taken from Wikipedia.

The Ventures

 

The Surfaris

Tune: Tequila

I need to get ready to hang out today, so have this song and this excerpt I ripped of from wikipedia.

In 1957, Gene Autry’s record label, Challenge Records, signed Dave Burgess (born 1934), a rockabilly singer-songwriter from California who often recorded under the name “Dave Dupree.” At the end of 1957, having produced no hits, Challenge Records looked to Burgess, who organized a recording session on December 23 in Hollywood. In the studio that day were Burgess on rhythm guitar, Cliff Hills on bass guitar, the Flores Trio (Danny Flores on saxophone and keyboards, Gene Alden on drums, and lead guitarist Buddy Bruce), and Huelyn Duvall contributing backing vocals. They gathered primarily to record “Train to Nowhere”, a song by Burgess, as well as “Night Beat” and “All Night Rock”.

The last tune recorded was “Tequila”, essentially just a jam by the Flores Trio. There were three takes, and Danny Flores, who wrote the song, was also the man who actually spoke the word “Tequila!”. Flores also played the trademark “dirty sax” solo.[3] The song served as the B-side for “Train to Nowhere”, which was released by Challenge Recordson January 15, 1958. Duvall recalls that the record initially found little success, but, after a DJ in Cleveland played the B-side, “Tequila” skyrocketed up the charts, reaching #1 on the Billboard chart on March 28, 1958.

Daniel Flores had written “Tequila”, but, because he was signed to another label, the tune was credited to “Chuck Rio”, a name he adopted for the stage. Those present for the December 23 session began recording together again on January 20, 1958, under the name the Champs; the group technically formed after recording “Tequila”. The tune has been noted to have the same sound and structure of Bo Diddley’s 1958 release “Dearest Darling”.